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Professional QEEG Program - November 5-7, 2014 | Oakland, CA

Professional QEEG Program - November 5-7, 2014 | Oakland, CA
Price: $550.00 - $1,095.00
Attendee Type Price Qty.
Individual $1,095.00
Group of 2 or more from one facility (each) $995.00
Student $550.00

Description

The Professional QEEG Program provides didactic and practical learning in acquisition and interpretation of EEG and QEEG and is an acredited 24-hour didactic for QEEGCB.

Electroencephalogram (EEG) has been used in the medical arena for over 50 years to diagnose sleep disorders and epileptiform behaviors among other things. Neurologists are trained to read raw EEG tracings and have been diagnosing based upon its findings for years. For the past 20 years, quantitative EEG has been in use to help distinguish psychological, as well as other physiological disorders, for example anxiety, ADHD, depression, traumatic brain injury and stroke. Quantitative EEG (QEEG) or brain mapping compares the individual EEG to a normative database consisting of subjects who are of comparable age and sex and during the same task. The use of QEEG greatly improves the ability to accurately design neurofeedback protocols and helps determine the best medication for specific brain wave profiles.

 

Instructor:

Jay Gunkelman. Learn more about Jay HERE

 

Dates: November 5-7, 2014

 

LOCATION: Oakland, California | Hilton Oakland Airport. Come for the course and stay for the BSC conference! More information (as it progresses) on the Biofeedback Society of California's 40th annual conference can be found HERE. Any BSC member who takes our course will be awarded a 2015 membership renewal to the BSC. Any non BSC members will be automatically given a 2015 membership.Learn more about BSC membership value HERE.

 

WHERE:

Hilton Oakland Airport Hotel 
1 Hegenberger Rd
Oakland, CA 94621

IMPORTANT RESERVATION GUIDELINES:

For your stay November 3-5, please call Vanessa at (925) 837-1100 X 111 (BSI) for  room rate of $139/night. For your stay November 6-9, you must call (510) 635-5000 (the hotel) for room night fee of $125/night. Use code BSC (Biofeedback Society of California).

 

Practice Gap:

Electroencephalogram (EEG) has been used in the medical arena for over 50 years to diagnose sleep disorders and epileptiform behaviors among other things. Neurologists are trained to read raw EEG tracings since the 1930s, though more recently quantitative EEG  (qEEG)has been in use to help characterize the pathophysiology of disorders such as anxiety, ADHD, depression, traumatic brain injury and stroke. QEEG compares the individual’s EEG to a normative database consisting of subjects who are of comparable age, and in a comparable state. The use of qEEG assists in accurately design neuromodulatory protocols and helps select appropriate medications.  

 

References:

Bente D (1964) Vigilanz, dissoziativeVigilanzverschiebung und Insuf?zienz des

Vigilita¨tstonus. In: Kranz H, Heinrich K (eds) Begleitwirkungen und Mißerfolge der psychiatrischenPharmakotherapie. Thieme, Stuttgart, pp 13–28

 

Cannon, R., Kerson, C., Hampshire, A. (2011). sLORETA and fMRI detection of medial

            prefrontal default network anomalies in adult ADHD. J. Neurotherapy:15 (4), 358-373

 

Congedo, M. (2003). Logistic discriminant functions in electroencephalography. J.

            Neurotherapy:7 (2). 5-23.

 

Cannon, R. Lubar,J.F., Congedo, M & Thornton, K. (2007)  The Effects of Neurofeedback Training in the Cognitive Division of The Anterior Cingulate Gyrus.International Journal of  Neuroscience 337-357.

 

Lubar, J. F., Congedo, M., & Askew, J.  (2003).  Low-resolution electromagnetitomography (LORETA) of cerebral activity in chronic depressive disorder.  International Journal of Psychophysiology, 49, 175-185.

 

Hammond, CD. (2006). Quantitative electroencephalography patterns associated with medical conditions. Biofeedback:34 (3). 87-94

 

Thatcher, R.W. Handbook of Quantitative Electroencephalography and EEG Biofeedback. 2012 ANI publishing

 

Educational need:

Understanding the pros and cons of the existing comparative databases, artifacting using eye ball and automatic techniques and acquisition procedures are essential for the practitioner and his or her staff to integrate QEEG into a practice. Introduction to LORETA and Z-score based neurofeedback

 

Abstract: This 2.5-day course will provide a foundation for understanding the importance of QEEG including LORETA (Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography) analysis for understanding basic brain function. This includes recording and analysis of multichannel EEG, evaluating and reducing artifacts and using the data to develop neurofeedback protocols..

 

9 Objectives for this course:

  1. 1.     The attendee will broaden his knowledge of qEEG recording, artifacting and analysis
  2. 2.     The attendee will gain practical knowledge on how to hook-up an EEG, including impedance control.
  3. 3.     The attendee will be introduced to Brodmann areas and brain wave connectivity measures to ensure fundamental knowledge of this paradigm of brain activity while training the client,
  4. 4.     The instructor will demonstrate how to develop neurofeedback protocols based on qEEG analysis and databases so the therapist or trainer can make the best protocol decisions.
  5. 5.     The instructor will introduce low resolution electromagnetic tomography analysis (LORETA), which is an important emerging assessment.
  6. 6.     Presentation of cases and their analyses will be provided so the psychologist can see how to develop the treatment plan based upon the QEEG, other testing and observation of the client.
  7. 7.     Current status and future trends in qEEG, neurofeedback and neuromodulation will be discussed to better equip the attendee with the many facets of research and the clinical efficacy of the treatment for many psychological disorders so he can consider the trends when discussing treatment options with clients.
  8. 8.     The attendee will have a better understanding about how drugs effect the EEG to better assess and treat patients who are taking medications.
  9. 9.     The attendee will become better prepared for QEEG certification to show competency in this area of assessment.

 

DAY 1 – 8 HOURS

 

INTRODUCTIONS

8:30 – 9:00

 (.5 hours)

Brief orientation and introductions by the instructor and attendees.

 

PHYSIOLOGICAL GENERATORS OF THE EEG WAVEFORMS

9:00 - 11:00

(2 hours)

(Obj 1, 9)

This section includes the dynamics of drowsiness and sleep onset will be reviewed to create a model of the underlying brain functions associated with the EEG patterns as well as a discussion about the EEG generators.

 

BREAK

11:00 – 11:15

(.25 hours)

 

A BRIEF HISTORY of QEEG AND REVIEW OF SIGNAL PROCESSING AND QEEG DATABASES

11:15 – 1:15

(2 hours)

(Obj. 1, 4, 5 & 9)

This section will cover historical landmarks from the first time Hans Berger viewed the EEG to the first database for quantitative analysis, developed by Matousek and Petersen, and a timeline depicting the development of the current QEEG interpretation software. Discussion of methods for signal processing of the EEG including filters, Fourier transform, Gabor transform and JTFA (joint time frequency analysis). This section will also include basics of montages, sampling, resolution, leakage and windowing as well as the impacts of cutting epochs and the use of digital artifacting methods.

 

LUNCH

1:15 – 2:15

(1 hour)

 

EEG RECORDING HANDS-ON SESSION  

2:15 – 4:00

(1.75 hours) 

(Obj. 1, 2 & 9)

Demonstration of recording of 19-channel EEG and patient preparation for reducing artifacts. Observation of physiological and electronic artifact and instruction on how to reduce or eliminate them.

 

BREAK

4:00 – 4:15 (.25 hours)

QEEG PRACTICUM

4:15-6:00

(1.75 hours)

(Obj 1, 2, 6 & 9)

Small groups will practice hooking up and recording their partners. A volunteer will provide his/her recording for analysis, including artifacting and interpretation by the instructor.

 

DAY 2 – 8 HOURS

 

ARTIFACTING AND MONTAGES

8:30-10:30

(2 hour)

(Obj. 1, 2, 3, 6, 8)

The art of artifacting remains the key to any analysis, and the detail of the approaches impacts the outcomes you can expect.  Techniques from visual analysis to spectral matching approaches, and newer blind sources analysis methods will be reviewed and demonstrated. The different montages, or sensor arrays, offer comparison of the active sensors to different references. Discussion about each montage’s pros, cons and their best uses.

 

BREAK

10:30 – 10:45

(.25 hours)

 

QEEG PHENOTYPES and QEEG-BASED TREATMENT IN ADHD, ADDICTION, PTSD AND INSOMNIA

10:45-12:45

(2 hours)

(Obj. 1, 4, 6 & 9)

The genetic basis of the EEG phenotypes and the ability of these EEG patterns to predict therapeutic outcome will be reviewed, including inter-rater reliability. Case series and published outcome studies in these various application areas will be reviewed.

 

LUNCH

12:45 – 1:45

(1 hour)

 

STANDARDS OF PRACTICE AND STANDARDS FOR CLAIMS OF EFFICACY

1:45-2:45

(1 hour)

(Obj. 5 & 9)

In this section, the standards for EEG and qEEG recordings as well as the “hierarchy for efficacy” determinations adopted by the field’s organizations will be reviewed, and both clinical category claims such as efficacy in ADHD, Depression, TBI, PTSD, Substance Use Disorders, Autism and even emerging non-DSM applications such as Z-score and LORETA based feedback will be evaluated with the field’s objective standards.

 

BREAK

2:45-3:00

(.25 hours)

 

VIGILANCE AND EEG: THE EUROPEAN VIGILANCE MODEL AND EEG OF DROWSINESS

 3:00-4:35

(1.5 hours)

(Obj 1, 7 & 9)

As the brain descends from being fully awake to being in stage two sleep, specific EEG changes occur, with the Vigilance model (Bente, 1964) describing this descent in great detail. This model breaks Stage 1 sleep (drowsiness) into 6 parts, detailing the changes, as vigilant control of attention is lost.  The model starts with posterior alpha, and changes with anteriorization of alpha, then "alpha drop-out" and the anteriorization of theta.  This model was expanded to include the CNS arousal level recently (Arns, VandenBergh, Gunkelman, 2009).

 

QEEG PRACTICUM

4:30-6:00

(1.5 hours)

(Obj 1, 2, 6 & 9)

Small groups will practice hooking up and recording their partners. A volunteer will provide his/her recording for analysis, including artifacting and interpretation by the instructor. This 3.25-hour section will include a 15-minute break.

 

DAY 3 – 8 HOURS

INTRODUCTION TO LORETA ANALYSIS OF QEEG

8:30-9:30

(1 hour)

(Obj. 5, 6 & 9)

In this section, the Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography (LORETA) analysis will be introduced and the previously-recorded sample recording will be interpreted.

 

QEEG ASSESSMENT FOR NEUROMODULATORY APPROACHES

9:30-10:30

(1 hour)

(Obj. 5, 6 & 9)

In this section, the Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography (LORETA) analysis will be introduced and the previously-recorded sample recording will be interpreted.

 

BREAK

10:30-10:45

(.25 hours)

 

 

 

 

 

NEUROMODULATION APPROACHES WITH TDCS AND THE EFFECTS ON THE EEG

10:45-11:30

(.75 hours)

(Obj 4, 7 & 9)

TDCS (transcranial direct current stimulation) involves direct current stimulation on specified areas of the brain to remediate specific behaviors. Its effect on the EEG will be discussed during this section of the course.

 

MEDICATION EFFECTS ON THE EEG

11:30 – 12:45

(1.25 hours)

(obj 8 & 9)

In this section the mechanistic effects drugs have on the EEG will be discussed. EEG records will be reviewed which point to many drug-related side-effects or adverse EEG reactions as noted in the instructor’s current published articles.

 

LUNCH

12:45 – 1:45

(1 hour)

 

BRODMANN AREAS AND BRAIN NETWORKING

1:45 – 3:45

(2 hours)

(Obj. 3 & 9)

In his webinar, “The Function of Specific Brain Areas and Brain Networks,” Dr. De Ridder discusses how the brain responds to internal and external environmental cues using a systematic anatomical approach. Attendees will view this webinar and the instructor will lead discussion following.

 

BREAK

3:45-4:00

(.25 hours)

 

CASE REVIEW

4:00 – 5:50

(1.5 hours)

(Obj 1, 2, 6 & 9)

Pre-post 40-session case with Dx of Autism and Epilepsy will be discussed. Review of recordings taken during the course and if there is time, cases brought by the attendees will also be discussed. Review of recordings taken during the course and if there is time, cases brought by the attendees will also be discussed.

 

 

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Target Audience / Level:

This is a beginners/intermediate course for psychologists, medical professionals, licensed MFT and LCSWs, RNs and BCIA applicants.

 

CEs available for APA, QEEGCB, ASET and BCIA. Purchase CEs HERE

 

Cancellation Policy: 75% refund up to 30 days prior; 50% refund up to 15 days prior; 20% refund up to 7 days prior, no refund 6 days prior or less.

 

We reserve the right to cancel courses with less than 3 people enrolled 15 days prior to the first day of the course.

 


 

 

View BSI webinar recordings at your own pace. Inexpensive CEs. www.bsiwebinars.com

 

Neurofeedback Bibliography with abstracts. Last compiled Sept '14

 

BSI BLOG

 

TESTIMONIALS FROM REPORT USERS AND COURSE ATTENDEES:

 

"What an honor and privilege to be taught QEEG and LORETA by two of the most recognized and respected people in the field of EEG; Joel Lubar, PhD and Jay Gunkleman, QEEGD. BSI's small class size, coupled with hands on experience gave us real insight into the mechanics of using QEEG with clients. I now feel ready to go forward by incorporating these techniques into my practice."
- - - RI, LMFT, CNT Los Angeles, CA

 

 

"To date I’ve done over 300 Qs with BSI and compared to other services I’ve used, their reports are far superior and Jay is always available for discussion of each case. I have learned so much from Jay by discussing these cases with him."

- - - RJS, PhD, LCSW, BCB, BCN, Houston, TX

 

"I have found BSI's recorded webinars as an excellent resource to improve my neurfoeedback skill sets. BSI's webinars provide user-friendly access to leading applied and research experts within neurofeedback. In addition, my graduate students have purchased recorded webinar sessions; they reported this resource reduces the complexity of neurofeedback through cohesive and comprehensive trainings related to neurofeedback."

- - - JL, EdD, Assistant Professor Psychology, Illinois Institute of Technology

 

"Dr. Kerson is an excellent teacher and neurofeedback supervisor. She provides a warm and caring approach to learning the process as well as the content - even when it is difficult to understand. She has a great sense of humor, and makes the learning interactive and fun. More importantly, she really cares about her students and takes the time to be sure everyone is succeeding."

- - - SS, PhD Associate Professor UNLV